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September 19 , 2008

 

Volume VI, No. 9

 

E-Source

An electronic newsletter highlighting veterinary issues for Illinois veterinarians

Pyrrhuloxia
Pyrrhuloxia
©Peter S. Weber
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In this Issue

Fulfill Your CE Requirement at ISVMA

ISVMA Convention Wet Labs - Register Now!

Printer Toner Scam Strikes in Illinois

FDA Eyes Mandatory Tracking Program for Food

Rabies Strategy Remains Novel

Reminder: World Rabies Day is September 28

About the Photo

Contact Us

Contact Us

peter@isvma.org

 

 

 

Fulfill Your Mandatory CE Hours at the ISVMA Annual Convention

Have you or a colleague you know waited until the last minute to get your mandatory CE hours? You're in luck! The ISVMA Annual Convention provides 20 hours of Continuing Education credit to participants who register and attend all three days (November 7-9, 2008 at the Westin Lombard Yorktown Center Hotel in Lombard, IL).

 

The Convention Prospectus is really in the mail! Some of you have already received it and others will be getting it as soon as the postal worker can get to your mailbox. If you can't wait and want to look through the full program schedule, session descriptions and more you can download a PDF copy of the ISVMA 2008 Annual Convention Prospectus from the ISVMA website.

 

Remember, the early bird registration deadline is October 6, 2008. You will save considerably if you register early and, if you wish to participate in one of the outstanding wet labs, you must register immediately to assure yourself of getting one of the limited spaces available.

Wet Labs at ISVMA Annual Convention Filling Fast - Register Soon!

In response to increased member demand for wet labs, the ISVMA Education Planning Committee put together a program with many hands-on learning opportunities. The popularity of the wet labs makes it critical that interested veterinary professionals register quickly to guarantee one of the limited spaces available. This year's wet lab offerings include:

 


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Friday, November 7, 2008 from 1 pm - 3 pm

 

WET LAB (Limit 28): Dental Radiographic Positioning, Radiographic Interpretation, Regional Nerve Blocks

 

Instructor: Stephen Juriga, DVM, DAVDC

 

Supporting Lecture: Oral Anatomy, "What You Really Need to Know" on Friday, November 7, 2008 from 10 am until 12 pm.

 

(DVM/CVT Only)


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Friday, November 7, 2008 from 1 pm - 3 pm

 

WET LAB (Limit 40): Puppy Aggression & Socialization

 

Instructor: Rolan Tripp, DVM

 

(Open to All Staff)

 

A tremendously popular program offered for third consecutive year. This usually fills up very quickly.


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Friday, November 7, 2008 from 10 am - 3 pm

 

WET LAB (Limit 30): Practical Aspects for Equine Joint Injections and Medications

 

Instructor: Allison Stewart, DVM

 

Supporting Lecture: Practical Aspects for Equine Joint Injections and Medications on Friday, November 7, 2008 from 10 am until 12 pm.

 

(DVM/CVT Only)


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Saturday, November 8, 2008 from 8 am - 12 pm

 

WET LAB (Limit 21) : Ophthalmology Surgery: You Can Do It, I Promise

 

Instructor: Ralph Hamor, DVM, MS, DACVO

 

(DVM Only)


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Saturday, November 8, 2008 from 1 pm - 5 pm

 

WET LAB (Limit 21) : Ophthalmology Surgery: You Can Do It, I Promise (Repeat of Previous Program)

 

Instructor: Ralph Hamor, DVM, MS, DACVO

 

(DVM Only)


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Sunday, November 9, 2008 from 8 am - 11:30 am

 

WET LAB (Limit 40): Kitten Socialization

 

Instructor: Rolan Tripp, DVM

 

(Open to All Staff)


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Sunday, November 9, 2008 from 8 am - 11:30 am

 

WET LAB/LECTURE (Limit 30): Pain Management Without the Pill

 

Instructor: Ava Frick, DVM

 

Supporting Lecture: Pain Management Without the Pill on Saturday, November 8, 2008
from 3 pm until 4:30 pm.

 

(DVM/CVT Only)


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Sunday, November 9, 2008 from 8 am - 11:30 am

 

WET LAB/LECTURE (Limit 20): The Neurologic Examination: Uncover the Mystery!

 

Instructor: Heidi Barnes-Heller, DVM, DACVIM-Neurology

 

(DVM/CVT Only)


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Sunday, November 9, 2008 from 1 pm - 4:15 pm

 

WET LAB/LECTURE (Limit 20): The Neurologic Examination: Uncover the Mystery! (Repeat of Previous Program)

 

Instructor: Heidi Barnes-Heller, DVM, DACVIM-Neurology

 

(DVM/CVT Only)

 

An Old Scam Has New Life

An veterinary practice in Will County, Illinois recently received a call from someone inquiring about their printer. The caller was checking to see if it was working properly. Within days, the practice received an invoice for approximately $600 from Business Data Resources for printer toner. The practice had neither ordered nor received any printer toner. Upon receipt of the invoice, the practice manager called the telephone number on the invoice and apparently a telemarketing service is cold calling on their behalf. The practice was successful in having the invoice cancelled.

 

This is a familiar scam to many business owners. The scam artists usually call during lunch hour in the hope of getting someone who isn't familiar ordering procedures. The caller may indicate that they are your practice's service representative and ask what kind of copier/printer you have; sometimes they even ask for the serial or model numbers. Then they may send you toner (usually second rate stuff) and claim you ordered it and tell you they spoke to someone in your practice and they even have your machine's serial or model number.

 

This is a reminder that you may wish to discuss this type of scam in a staff meeting. In the case of the printer toner scam, one of the warning signs would be someone claiming to be your service representative asking for your printer's model or serial number. If they were actually your service representative, they would already know!

 

(courtesy AVMA)

FDA Eyes Mandatory Tracking Program for Food

MSNBC
By Christopher Doering

 

WASHINGTON - A mandatory traceability system in the United States would help improve the safety of food, such as produce, a health official told lawmakers on Wednesday, three weeks after the government declared an end to the worst foodborne outbreak in a decade. Read more...

 

Story linked courtesy of the AVMA

Rabies Strategy Remains Novel

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
By Mark Johnson

Four years after Fond du Lac teenager Jeanna Giese was bitten by a bat in a church, she remains the only human known to have survived rabies without vaccine. Read more...

Story linked courtesy of the AVMA

Reminder: World Rabies Day is September 28

The world is again joining together on September 28th to raise awareness and understanding about the importance of rabies prevention. Rabies is the oldest and deadliest disease known to mankind and the Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association is supporting this initiative.

Led by the Alliance for Rabies Control and supported by numerous human and animal health organizations worldwide, World Rabies Day is a unique campaign that brings together hundreds of thousands of people across the world to reinforce the message that rabies is a preventable disease, yet kills 55,000 people needlessly each year, half of which are children under the age of 151.

“Rabies is primarily a disease of children, who are particularly at risk from this terrible disease, due to their close contact with dogs, the major global source”, said Dr. Debbie Briggs, Executive Director of the Alliance for Rabies Control. “Children are more likely to suffer multiple bites and scratches to the face and head, both of which carry a higher risk of contracting rabies. Children are often unaware of the danger that dogs transmit rabies and may not tell their parents when a bite, lick, or scratch has occurred from an infected animal”, says Briggs.

Rabies is a viral disease that can be transmitted to animals and humans. The disease is transmitted mainly by bite, but exposure may also occur through contamination of broken skin or mucous membranes with saliva from an infected animal. Once neurological symptoms of the disease develop, rabies is fatal to both animals and humans. The good news is that rabies is easily preventable. “Vaccination prior to possible exposure is a crucial part of health management of domestic animals, and is the single most important factor in rabies prevention”, said Peter Costa, Global Communications Coordinator for the Alliance for Rabies Control.

Rabies prevention starts with the animal owner. Protect yourself, your pet and your community by taking animals to be vaccinated. Avoid stray animals and wildlife. If you are bitten, wash bite wounds with soap and water and seek medical attention immediately. If your pet is bitten, consult your veterinarian immediately. Prompt and appropriate treatment after being bitten and before the disease develops can stop rabies infection and/or prevent the disease in humans and animals.

A cornucopia of valuable resources on rabies education and prevention is available at http://www.worldrabiesday.org/EN/Education-Bank/english.html. Veterinary professionals may use this information to inform their clients and promote vaccination.

ISVMA will also issue a statewide press release in an effort to heighten awareness of the importance of vaccinating pets to protect both the animal and their human owners from rabies. We encourage you to also write an opinion editorial for your local newspaper using the information in the above referenced documents to help with the worldwide effort to prevent rabies infection.

About the Photo

The Pyrrhuloxia (Cardinalis sinuatus) is a medium-sized North American bird in the same genus as the Northern Cardinal and the Vermilion Cardinal, which is a South American species. The name "Pyrrhuloxia" is a combination of the genus names Pyrrhula (bullfinches) and Loxia (crossbills). The roots mean "flame-colored" and "crooked," and aptly describe the reddish bird with the crooked bill.

 

The most obvious differences between the male Pyrrhuloxia and the Northern Cardinal are the former's largely gray coloring with a red breast, a red rather than black mask, and a yellow parrot-like bill. The females of the two species resemble each other much more closely, but the shapes of their bills are diagnostic. The songs of the two species are identical, though the Pyrrhuloxia's is not quite as loud. Where both the Pyrrhuloxia and Northern Cardinal breed, territories of the two species may overlap, and no conflicts have been recorded between the species.

 

The Pyrrhuloxia is resident in Mexico and the southern parts of the U.S. states of Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas. Its preferred habitat is desert scrub, mesquite grassland, and riparian woodland. Its diet consists of seeds, insects, and fruits. Most of the seeds consumed are from grasses and weeds. It gleans insects from trees and shrubs and picks seeds from stalks. It will also visit feeders.

 

Large areas of the Pyrrhuloxia's habitat in the southwestern United States have been lost to development by humans; therefore populations appear to be declining slightly.

 

I photographed this male Pyrrhuloxia at Falcon state Park in Texas in December 2006.

Contact Us

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