ISVMA Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association
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April 7 , 2009

 

Volume VI, No. 27

 

E-Source

An electronic newsletter highlighting veterinary issues for Illinois veterinarians

Lesser Scaup
Lesser Scaup
© Peter S. Weber
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In this Issue

ISVMA Legislative Update

ISVMA Lobby Day Recap

New Red Flags Rule Does Not Exempt Veterinarians

Human Virus Blamed for Death of Chimp at Lincoln Park Zoo

About the Photo

Contact Us

Contact Us

peter@isvma.org

 

 

 

Legislative Update - Bill Status As First Deadline Passes

We are technically at the halfway point of the current legislative session because April 3, 2009 was the deadline for all bills to either pass in their house of origin (House of Representatives or Senate) or fail. In reality, ISVMA is much more than halfway through on its legislative agenda. Every bill ISVMA opposed this year has either been defeated or has been amended to remove our objections. Every bill that ISVMA introduced this year has passed unanimously when voted upon (with the exception of a single no vote on House Bill 2331).

 

We are very grateful to the hundreds of ISVMA members that participated in our grassroots advocacy efforts and at the ISVMA Lobby Day on April 1, 2009. Your involvement has made all the difference in our effectiveness!

 

The following is a summary of the bills we have been working on this session. You can click on the hyperlinks for any of the bills listed to get more information.

* denotes the bill is an initiative of the ISVMA

 

House Bill 198 - Dog Breeder License Act

The ISVMA opposed this bill and it failed to pass.

House Bill 364 - Veterinary Student Loan Repayment Program Act*

On March 4, 2009 this ISVMA initiative passed the Illinois House of Representatives on a vote of 109-0-0. It must now be considered by the Illinois State Senate before being sent to the Governor for final action. Representative David Reis was the House sponsor and Senator Michael Frerichs has agreed to be the Senate sponsor.

House Bill 583 - Repeals Prohibition on Horse Slaughter

On February 24, 2009 a motion to pass House Bill 583 was approved by the House Agriculture and Conservation Committee on a vote of 11-2-0 and the bill was placed on the Order of Second Reading in the House of Representatives.

 

On March 10, 2009 an amendment to the bill was adopted in the House 111-1-0 to add a provision to the bill creating an Equine Rescue Assistance Fund.

 

The bill was called for a vote in the Illinois House of Representatives and failed to pass.

House Bill 678 - Equine Transportation

On March 4, 2009 a motion to pass House Bill 678 was approved by the House Vehicles and Safety Committee. The bill was called for a vote in the Illinois House of Representatives and failed to pass.

House Bill 2331 - Practice Pending Permits*

This bill is an ISVMA initiative designed to allow recent graduates of accredited veterinary colleges, made application for licensure and either passed their NAVLE or are awaiting their NAVLE results to practice under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian until they receive notice of failing their NAVLE test, withdraw their application or obtain their license.

 

House Bill 2331 passed the Illinois House of Representatives on a vote of 115-1-0. It must now be considered by the Illinois State Senate before being sent to the Governor for final action. It was sponsored in the House by Representative William Black. A companion bill was sponsored in the Senate by Senator Michael Frerichs.

House Bill 2407 - Internet Prescribing Prohibition Act

On March 5, 2009 this bill was tabled by the sponsor.

House Bill 3887 - Euthanasia Technicians*

On March 11, 2009 a motion to pass House Bill 3887 was approved by the House Judiciary I - Civil Law Committee on a vote of 13-0-0. The bill was placed on the Order of Second Reading - Short Debate in the House of Representatives.

 

This is another ISVMA initiative. The bill specified that euthanasia by certified euthanasia technicians shall be conducted only "within the physical premises of" (rather than "in") an animal shelter licensed under the Animal Welfare Act or an animal control facility licensed under the Animal Welfare Act.

 

The ISVMA chose to hold the bill and amend Senate Bill 38, another bill dealing with euthanasia, to include our amendatory language.

House Bill 3888 - Pet Lemon Law*

On March 10, 2009 a motion to pass House Bill 3888 was approved by the House Consumer Protection Committee on a vote of 14-0-0 and was placed on the Order of Second Reading - Short Debate in the House of Representatives.

 

This is another ISVMA initiative which would establish a Pet Lemon Law for consumers who purchase puppies and kittens. It sets forth responsibilities for pet retailers and pet owners and establishes specific remedies for pet owners who purchase unhealthy animals under specified conditions.

 

The ISVMA chose to hold the bill and include the discussion of consumer protection in the legislative task force, established by Senate Joint Resolution 56, to address issues related to puppy mills and pet shops.

Senate Bill 38 - Euthanasia Limitations

On February 25, 2009 a motion to pass Senate Bill 38 was approved by the Senate Agriculture and Conservation Committee on a vote of 6-4-0 and the bill is currently on Third Reading in the Senate.

 

ISVMA removed its opposition to Senate Bill 38 when the sponsor agreed to an amendment we proffered. By agreement with the sponsor, the bill will be further amended to delete a reference to the use of "liquids or substances that can be placed in a dog's food or mouth" for the purposes of euthanasia. The bill will also be amended to include the language offered by ISVMA in House Bill 3888 which clarifies the limitations on where a certified euthanasia technician can euthanatize an animal.

Senate Bill 53 - Dog Breeder License Act

On March 11, 2009 a motion to pass Senate Bill 53 was approved by the Senate Licensed Activities Committee on a vote of 6-3 with the condition that the bill would be "shelled" so that all interested parties could work together to develop agreed language that would address shared concerns associated with puppy mill operations.

 

A "shell" amendment strips a bill of all substantive language and makes a technical amendment to a statute (Public Act). The technical amendment (shell) could be replacing a single word (e.g. replace "the" with "a"). This type of amendment is common when trying to keep a controversial bill alive in the hope that an agreement can be reached at a later date. It allows the bill to continue meeting deadlines (as an empty shell) that would otherwise result in it being killed.

 

The ISVMA opposed Senate Bill 53 and House Bill 198 as they were submitted. We also agreed to work with the bill sponsor to develop meaningful and effective language to crack down on puppy mill operators. The legislative task force established by Senate Joint Resolution 56 will bring the interested parties together for that purpose.

Senate Bill 139 - Tail Docking / Ear Cropping

On March 11, 2009 a technical amendment to (shell) Senate Bill 39 was approved by the Senate Agriculture and Conservation Committee and a motion to approve Senate Bill 139 as a shell bill was approved on a vote of 6-4-0 and the shell bill was placed on the Order of Second Reading in the Senate. The deadline for passing this bill was extended to April 30, 2009.

Senate Bill 1336 - Bovine Tail Docking

Senate Bill 1336 failed in the Senate.

Senate Bill 1337 - Farm Animal Confinement

Senate Bill 1337 failed in the Senate.

Senate Bill 1443 - Veterinary Teaching Hospital*

On April 3, 2009 the bill was passed in the Illinois State Senate by a vote of 57-0-0.

 

This bill is an ISVMA initiative to clarify and align a series of exemptions related to licensure for the faculty and facilities at the University of Illinois College of Veterinary Medicine.

Senate Bill 1830 - Practice Pending Permits*

This bill is an ISVMA initiative designed to allow recent graduates of accredited veterinary colleges, made application for licensure and either passed their NAVLE or are awaiting their NAVLE results to practice under the direct supervision of a licensed veterinarian until they receive notice of failing their NAVLE test, withdraw their application or obtain their license.

 

Senate Bill 1830 passed the Illinois State Senate by a vote of 57-0-0 on April 1, 2009. It must now be considered by the Illinois House of Representatives before being sent to the Governor for final action. It was sponsored by Senator Michael Frerichs in the Senate. A companion bill was sponsored in the House by Representative William Black.

The status of all bills being worked on by ISVMA is available for members to check at http://capwiz.com/isvma/issues/bills/. Members can link to each bill on this list and read a short description, read the entire bill text, and use the "Take Action Now" link to contact your legislators to communicate your thoughts and position on the bill.

ISVMA Lobby Day Recap

Lobby DayThe ISVMA held its Fifth Annual Lobby Day on April 1, 2009 in Springfield. We nearly doubled the number of participants this year and the work done by ISVMA members will pay dividends for a long time! Many new relationships between legislators and ISVMA members were established and existing relationships were strengthened by our focused efforts. We received some valuable feedback from legislators on the bills we have worked on during this session.

 

During our Lobby Day activities, the Illinois House of Representatives debated and voted on House Bill 583 which would have repealed the ban on horse slaughter in Illinois. State representatives were very interested in discussing the issue with ISVMA members. The bill fell a few votes short of passage in the House and failed to pass prior to the deadline.

 

Three ISVMA members were photographed (above) while talking to Senator Dale Righter outside of the Senate Chamber. They are (from left to right): Dr. Lisa Eller, Senator Righter, Ashley Maul (VM2), and Aaron Lower (VM4).

 

Approximately 25 veterinary students participated in Lobby Day this year and Emily Wheeler (VM4) did an outstanding job of recruiting and coordinating the student participants. Thank you Emily!

New Red Flags Rule May Help Curb ID Theft

(Courtesy AVMA). … A new report in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association reminds industry members that veterinarians are not exempt from the Red Flags Rule. A reason for the FTC delay in enforcing the rule was to allow companies and organizations the chance to sort out whether they were required to comply, according to the AVMA. …

Read more...

Human Virus Blamed for Death of Chimp at Lincoln Park Zoo
...Officials say it's unclear how 9-year-old Kipper was exposed to illness

(Chicago Tribune - April 4, 2009) A mysterious infection that led to the death of a 9-year-old male chimpanzee at Lincoln Park Zoo last week has been identified as a respiratory virus that causes at least 15 percent of the common colds suffered by humans worldwide every year.

 

Kipper, the chimp who died March 24 in the zoo hospital, was the youngest member of a seven-member family headed by the male chimp Hank. Since his death, the zoo veterinary staff has been trying to identify the illness that befell all seven members of the chimp group he lived with. Read more...

About the Photo

Two scaup species live in North America. The Greater Scaup prefers salt water and is usually seen in large rafts, often composed of thousands of birds, on large lakes or coastal bays. The Lesser Scaup prefers freshwater and is found only in North America where it is one of the most abundant and widespread of the diving ducks on the continent.

 

Male Lesser Scaups have white flanks, black rumps and breasts, and lined gray backs. They have purplish-black, iridescent heads and yellow eyes. Their bills are light gray-blue. Males in non-breeding plumage have black heads and breasts, brown bodies, and black rumps. Females are brownish overall, also with yellow eyes, and white at the base of their bills. Greater and Lesser Scaups can be difficult to distinguish in the field. Lesser Scaups average about 10% shorter and 25% lighter than Greater Scaups. The Lesser has a peaked, angular head that the Greater lacks. Seen in flight, the white on the Lesser Scaup's wings fades to gray in the primaries. In the Greater Scaup, the white extends into the primaries. As always, taking into account habitat, range, and season may help differentiate between the two species, as well as using a field guide and working with experienced observers.

 

Lesser Scaup breed from interior Alaska and northern Canada south to Colorado, Iowa, and occasionally farther east. They spend winters regularly along coasts south from British Columbia and Massachusetts to Gulf of Mexico; also inland south of Colorado and the Great Lakes. Their preferred habitats include ponds and marshes; during migration and in winter, the species is found on lakes, rivers, and ponds, and in the southern states on saltwater. The continental population of breeding Lesser Scaup exhibits large yearly fluctuations. There has been a marked recent decline in populations.

 

Adult Lesser Scaup may pretend to be dead (immobile with head extended, eyes open, and wings held close to body) when grasped by a red fox. Lesser Scaup chicks are capable of diving under water on their hatching day, but they are too buoyant to stay under for more than just a moment. By the time they are 5 to 7 weeks old they are able to dive for 2-25 seconds and swim underwater for 50-60 feet.

 

Because it dives for mollusks and other animals and is not as much of a vegetarian as the Redhead or the Canvasback, the Lesser Scaup is not considered as choice a game bird, although it is still shot in large numbers annually.

 

I photographed this male Lesser Scaup in Las Vegas, NV in February 2009.

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