ISVMA Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association
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August 16 , 2011

 

Volume IX, No. 2

 

E-Source

An electronic newsletter highlighting veterinary issues for Illinois veterinarians

Forster's Tern
Forster's Tern

(click on photo to see larger image)

In this Issue

Parvovirus at Champaign County Humane Society

Hackers Shift to Small Companies

Governor Quinn Signs New Law Requiring New Law Requiring Shelters to Scan Twice for Microchips

Governor Signs Changes to Controlled Substances Act

Distributor Runs Out of Heartworm Treatment Drug

Check and Confirm the Accuracy of Your Practice Listing Using the ISVMA "Find a Veterinarian" Search Tool

ISVMA Sponsored Benefit Programs Can Save Your Practice Money

Survey Results Will Help Vet College Chart Its Course

About the Photo

Contact Us

peter@isvma.org

 

ISVMA Facebook Fan Page

 

 

Parvovirus at Champaign County Humane Society

The Champaign County Humane Society has temporarily stopped accepting dogs. Three cases of Canine Parvovirus popped up in the last week. Workers say there's also an increase in kennel cough. The shelter will start accepting dogs again on August 24th. People who are looking to give up a pet should contact Champaign County Animal Services or other area shelters.

Hackers Shift Attack to Small Companies

If you think as a small business owner that you are immune from cyber crimes, think again. In a recent article in The Wall Street Journal, cyber theft is on the rise.

One tip bears repeating: "financially motivated attacks typically rely on computer code hackers plant on victims' computers, often as attachments or links in emails sent to employees." While these malicious programs are well known to security experts, hackers tweak them frequently enough to render them undetectable to antivirus software. So warn all your employees not to open attachments or click on links from emails when they do not recognize the sender. And finally, purchase the most aggressive antivirus software to protect your system.

For more information, read this important article by Geoffrey A. Fowler and Ben Worthen, and then contact your insurance carrier to discuss how a cyber liability policy might protect your company from vicious cyber attacks.

Governor Quinn Signs New Law Requiring Shelters to Scan Twice for Microchips

On August 3, 2011, Govern Patrick Quinn signed Public Act 97-0240 which provides that when dogs or cats are apprehended and impounded, they must be scanned for the presence of a microchip and examined for other currently acceptable methods of identification, including, but not limited to, identification tags, tattoos, and rabies license tags. The examination for identification must be done within 24 hours after the intake of the dog or cat.

The bill also provides notification requirements to owners, agents and caretakers.

Finally, it provides that if the dog or cat has been microchipped and the primary contact listed by the manufacturer cannot be located or refuses to reclaim the dog or cat, an attempt shall be made to contact any secondary contacts listed by the manufacturer prior to adoption, transfer or euthanitization.

Prior to transferring the dog or cat to another humane shelter, rescue group, or euthanization, the dog or cat shall be scanned again for the presence of a microchip and examined for other means of identification. If a second scan provides the same identifying information as the initial intake scan and the owner, agent, or caretaker has not been located or refuses to reclaim the dog or cat, the animal control facility may proceed with the adoption, transfer, or euthanitization. The bill becomes effective on January 1, 2012.

View the current text and status of the law.

Governor Signs Changes to Controlled Substances Act

On August 12, 2011, Governor Quinn signed into law various amendments to the Illinois Controlled Substances Act. The new law amends (1) defined terms, (2) rules relating to scheduling, dispensing and prescribing of controlled substances, (3) the list of anabolic steroids, and (4) the Prescription Monitoring Program. The bill also permits an authorized prescriber to issue electronic prescriptions for Schedule II through V controlled substances if done in accordance with federal rules. Veterinarians are included in the definitions of practitioner and prescriber.

View the current text and status of the law.

For other legislative news, please refer to the August ISVMA Legislative Report.

Distributor Runs Out of Heartworm Treatment Drug

(Courtesy AVMA) - The Georgia-based distributor of immiticide, the only drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration to treat heartworm in dogs, has run out of the medicine since the manufacturer temporarily ceased production. Distributor Merial notified veterinarians of the shortage in early August and said it is searching for a new supplier, but the process could take months. Missouri veterinarian Mark Hale says only about 40% of the dogs he sees are on a heartworm preventative and his practice only has enough immiticide to treat one more patient. KSPR-TV (Springfield, Mo.)

Check and Confirm the Accuracy of Your Practice Listing Using the ISVMA "Find a Veterinarian" Search Tool

Nearly 20,000 people visit the ISVMA website every day. Many of them use the " Find a Veterinarian" search tool to locate a nearby veterinarian.

There are two ways to use the "Find a Veterinarian" search tool:

1. The public can use the "Find a Veterinarian" link located just below the "Home" button on the vertical link bar at the left side of the ISVMA website. This search tool will only list ISVMA member veterinarians. Non-member veterinarians will not show up using the public search tool. Those members that have not paid their dues by July 30, 2011 (after the 30-day grace period) will no longer show up on this public search tool.

To get a listing of ISVMA member veterinarians associated with your practice, type in your practice name in the "Organization" search field.

2. If any ISVMA member logs into the Member Center, you can get a complete listing of veterinarians and technicians listed for your practice in our database and their membership status using the Member Directory Link on the horizontal (orange) link bar at the top of the ISVMA website.

To get a complete listing of all veterinarians and technicians associated with your practice in our database (and their membership status), type in your practice name in the "Organization" search field.

IMPORTANT: Please take a few minutes to have an ISVMA member from your practice log in to check the listing for your practice. Review the veterinarians and technicians listed for your practice and contact ISVMA if there are any changes. If you have a veterinarian or technician that has left your practice, please let us know where they have relocated. If you have a veterinarian or technician that is in your practice, but not listed, please let us know so that we can update our database. If there are any changes to your practice staffing list, please email peter@isvma.org with the requested information.

About the Photo

Forster's Terns are 14-16 1/2 inches in length with a 30 inch wingspread. Forster's Tern is easily mistaken for the Common Tern, however their calls are very different. In summer it is black-capped with a white breast and light grey mantle. The deeply forked tail is pale grey with white outer edges and a dark border along the inside of fork. Its wing tips are silvery white or frost grey. The bill is orange-red with black tip, it has orange-red feet, and dark brown eyes. In winter plumage, the head lacks the black cap but is distinguished by narrow black band through and back of the eyes and black spot near its ear. The feet are yellowish and bill is dark.

 

Forster's Tern occurs in Illinois from late April-mid May, and late July-mid October. This species is a common migrant and occasional summer resident in the northeast part of Illinois. In 1979 several summered at Lake Calumet and suggested possible nesting activity. The first confirmed Illinois nesting record in many years was in 1982 at Chain of Lakes State Park where 16 pairs nested producing at least 9 young.

 

The Forster's Tern appeared on the Illinois endangered species list's last revision in 1977. This species apparently depends upon larger inland lakes with marsh borders for nesting and its numbers have probably declined with the loss of this preferred habitat. The Forster's Tern still satisfies the 3 requirements for inclusion as an endangered species: 1) small population numbers in Illinois; 2) preferred habitat threatened; and 3) history of decline. The Forster's Tern is also protected under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, 1918 and the Illinois Wildlife Code, 1971.

 

I photographed this basic-plumaged Forster's Tern near Cape May, New Jersey in 2004.

Contact Us

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Illinois State Veterinary Medical Association
1121 Chatham Road
Springfield, IL 62704

Phone: (217) 546-8381

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